Wednesday, January 22, 2014

Jade Triad table - tutorial



 We start with a drawing of the plan. The idea for these two 24"-square boards is to have a sluice canal. There's a lot of water on this table, but most of it will be playable. The rise terraces are counted as difficult ground. A lot of bridges and pontoons will be used and the models will be able to use little boats to move over the water.

We make sure everything is compatible with the other boards first. The boards can also be combined with the other edge as well.

Pieces of green foam are cut in the right shape. They are smoothed over with sandpaper before the stone designs are drawn into it with a pencil or biro.

After a few hours of work the stones are completed.

For the borders of the terraces a half-round shaped strip of blue foam is glued in place. Blue foam is a strong and flexible product, perfect for smaller details.

The shape of the terraces is done with a palette knife from a mix of filler plaster and PVA glue. The white glue makes your plaster much harder and avoids any crack formations or flakiness.

Edges are filled and flattened.

The frog faces are for filling the water in the sluice canals. They are made by pressing a little statue in plasticine a few times so you have different molds you can fill with dental plaster. Once glued in place, the painting can start with the undercoats, highlights and weathering effects.


 
The sluice doors and pontoons are made and painted separately and will be put in place once the water zones are varnished.


The undeep water for the rice terraces is made in trompe-l'oeil technique. They are varnished afterwards.

Cool details can be added, like a drawbridge for example.

As a final part, flocks and long grass are fixed in place. I also cut the CT-Scenery monkey statues for esthetics and to show the depth of the terraces.

 I hoped you liked the tutorial. Do not hesitate should you have any questions.












21 comments:

  1. Very nice

    I have some of this line as well as some random features but I haven't been able to pull it all together for a cohesive theme. You've given me some ideas and some super inspiration - thank you!

    Really super stuff!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks very much for the comment.

      Cheers ;)

      Delete
  2. Gosh! So real and well done. I wish I have a tenth of your skills.

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  3. Great looking gaming board with some very cool details.

    Very well done and thank you for sharing the w-i-p images.

    Tony

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Tony,

      You're very welcome for the wip.

      Cheers ;)

      Delete
  4. What ratio do you mix the plaster/PVA? Is it just straight PVA or is it watered down too?

    I don't think I've seen a better Japanese style board before, looks fantastic!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you very much the one,

      Just add a little bit of pure PVA, say 1/15th, to the plaster. Keep in mind that the plaster will dry much faster than normally. Better to work with little mixes than one big bunch of mixed plaster.

      Hope this helps.

      Cheers ;)

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    2. It has indeed, (nods head and smiles in gratitude).

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  5. This is undoubtedly, one of the most fantastic works that I have seen. My more sincere congratulation for the effort and the dedication. A great greeting.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks amigo,

      Greetings to you ;)

      Delete
  6. Wow sir - A stunning display and very educational. Thank you so much.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Glad to give you some inspiration ;)

      Cheers

      Delete
  7. Replies
    1. Thanks a lot QC,

      Greetings ;)

      Delete
  8. You are the Master.
    Fantastic work, thanks for sharing.
    Pat.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks Pat for the kind comment,

      Not sure I'm the master yet as they are a lot of techniques still to master. We are still young padawans with a lot to learn ;)

      Cheers !

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  9. Superbe, impressionnant et très inspiré...vraiment très réussi!

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    Replies
    1. Merci Phil,

      Cette table fut un plaisir à réaliser.

      A bientôt,

      Delete